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The Deed is Done: The Weekly Market Update

The Deed is Done: The Weekly Market Update
McLean Mortgage

The Fed Speaks

The Fed Speaks

The Federal Reserve Board’s Open Market Committee met last week to consider raising short-term interest rates. As we approached the meeting, the consensus was that the Fed would move their Discount and Federal Funds Rate higher by one-quarter of one percent. The weaker than expected jobs report put a bit of doubt in some analysts’ minds; however, most were still expecting the increase to be approved.

Thus, no increase would have been somewhat of a surprise and an increase of more than one-quarter of a percent would have been a major surprise. Therefore, the fact that the Fed moved by one-quarter of one percent was seen as somewhat of a non-event. Just as importantly, their statement released at the conclusion of the meeting provided us clues as to what the members thought of the state of the economy. The statement lauded the progress of the economy and downgraded their forecast for inflation. They continue to espouse a gradual rise in rates and, in the fourth quarter, the Fed expects to start selling off some of the assets they have amassed in the past to help the economy.

Anytime we are focused upon actions by the Federal Reserve Board, we have to remind our readers which interest rates the Fed controls directly. The Federal Funds Rate and the Discount Rate are rates the Fed charges member banks and member banks charge each other for overnight funds to balance their sheets. Thus, when we indicated that these are short-term rates, they are very short term. In reaction, other short-term rates such as three- and six-month T-Bills are affected most directly. On the other side of the coin, long-term rates, such as home loans, can move in tandem or have a different reaction, especially if the markets feel that the Fed is staying ahead of any threat of inflation. Thus, an increase in interest rates for home loans are not guaranteed to follow suit, though certainly the Fed’s action last week does pose that possibility.

The Weekly Market Update

Rates were up slightly last week, remaining near their lowest levels of the year. For the week ending June 15, Freddie Mac announced that 30-year fixed rates rose two ticks to 3.91% from 3.89% the week before. The average for 15-year loans also rose slightly to 3.18%, and the average for five-year adjustables moved up to 3.15%. A year ago, 30-year fixed rates averaged 3.54%.

Attributed to Sean Becketti, chief economist, Freddie Mac — “The rate on 30-year loans rose 2 basis points over the week to 3.91 percent. However, our survey was conducted before investors drove Treasury yields sharply lower in a reaction to the surprisingly weak CPI release. If that drop in yields sticks, rates on home loans are likely to follow in next week’s survey.”

Note: Rates indicated do not include fees and points and are provided for evidence of trends only. They should not be used for comparison purposes.